We are not culpable for “wrong opinions”

When we act, our bodily movements are caused by mental states. These mental states consist of a desire to achieve a particular goal, and some relevant beliefs which help us “steer a course through the world” towards achieving the goal.

It all means a human agent is a bit like a sophisticated version of a cruise missile, which is programmed to reach a target, and to do something (usually explode) when it gets there. It steers a course towards its target by comparing the terrain it flies over with its onboard computer map.

Although both the map and the targeting are necessary for it to reach its goal, the map is “neutral” in the sense that it only contains information about the outside world. It is compatible with the missile hitting any other target within the mapped area, and with its doing good things like delivering medicine or food aid when it reaches its target (not just doing something bad like exploding).

If the “act” of a cruise missile is to be praised or condemned, we judge what it is programmed to do, and where. We do not judge its map, whose greater or lesser accuracy simply results in greater or lesser efficiency in fulfilling the aim of the programming.

It should be the same with human agents. If we praise or condemn what they do, it should be with reference to the good or evil they intend to do, or are willing to do, and to whom. We should suspend judgement of an agent’s beliefs when we judge his actions, as beliefs are “neutral” with respect to the good or evil of what they help to achieve, just like the cruise missile’s onboard map. Like the accuracy of the missile’s map, the truth or falsity of an agent’s beliefs affect his success or efficiency in achieving gaols, but the beliefs do not set any goals. A belief can be true or false, but it can’t be good or bad. The worst an opinion can be is false, rather than “aimed at an evil goal”.

Despite the neutral role of beliefs, some people blame others for having the “wrong” opinions, or in other words for not believing what they “should believe”. For example, many Muslims think “apostasy” should be punished by death. Many Westerners think “denialism” should be ostracised or worse.

Those are remarkably similar views, and both are primitive, in the worst sense of the word. They belong to a backward state of society. They are inspired by confused understandings of agency, and we should reject them. If someone has false beliefs, he has either had bad luck (by being exposed to unreliable sources of knowledge) or he is epistemically ill-equipped. In neither case is he culpable.

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